Topic: Preposition phrase

These resources cover preposition phrases (sometimes called prepositional phrase): phrases with a preposition as the Head word. Typically the preposition is followed by a noun or noun phrase. The following are all preposition phrases: at home, under the table, in a very bad mood.

Identify the type of phrase

Identify the type of phrase (noun phrase, preposition phrase, etc.) in each of the examples. Although we have included verb phrases as an option, remember that the National Curriculum calls these clauses.

 

Orientating a scene: prepositions in travel guides

Goals

  • To understand how prepositions construct meaning in a non-fiction text.
  • For students to apply this to their own writing.

What and how do prepositions mean?

Begin by showing your class a list of prepositions (or - even better - ask them to generate the list themselves). Display the list on the board, and ask: what do prepositions do and how do they do it? The discussion should arrive at the following conclusions:

Phrases

phrase consists of one or more words that belong together. It takes one of the major word class elements (noun, adjective, etc.) as its Head.

Preposition phrases

A preposition phrase has a preposition as its Head word, usually followed by a noun phrase. Here are some examples of preposition phrases, showing a preposition + noun phrase sequence:

  • in + boxes
  • in + the boxes
  • in + the big boxes under the table

The noun phrase can be a single word or a string of words, as the examples show.

Here are some examples of prepositional phrases in sentences:

Prepositions in instructional writing

Prepositions are particularly important when trying to communicate instructions about time and place.

The Activity page appears in the menu entitled 'This Unit' in the upper right corner of this page. The Activity page contains one slide: an example of instructional writing from our corpus. You can see that quite precise instructions are given as part of a recipe. It is reprinted below with the prepositions highlighted.

Method

Using Adverbials in Non-Fiction Texts

Lesson Plan

Goals:

  • Explain what an Adverbial is and how they are formed 
  • Distinguish between fronted and non-fronted Adverbials 
  • Explore how Adverbials are used to order information. 

The lesson activities are divided into part 1 and 2. 

Part 1

Warmer

Using Adverbials in Non-Fiction Texts

Activities: Part 1

Warmer

  1. What is an Adverbial? 
  2. What kind of grammatical units (structures) can function as Adverbial?
  3. What is a 'fronted Adverbial'? 
  4. Why do writers use Adverbials? Why do they move them around in sentences? 

An adverbial:

Using Adverbials in Non-Fiction Texts

Activities: Part 2

In part 1, you looked at Adverbials and how they are formed. 

In this lesson, you will look at three texts and see how Adverbials help to organise information. 

Warmer

Soon, you will read three non-fiction texts. Before you do, discuss these quesitons: 

Writing a story with prepositions

Applying knowledge of prepositions to a short story

This lesson looks at how you might use your knowledge of prepositions and preposition phrases to write a short story aimed at children.

Y6 GPaS Test: Identify the preposition phrase

Find the preposition phrase in a range of examples

Identify the preposition phrase in each of the following examples. Click on the words that comprise the phrase to select or deselect them.

Y6 GPaS Test: Preposition phrases, adverb phrases, and time

In each of the following examples, indicate whether time is expressed using a preposition phrase or an adverb phrase:

»

Englicious contains many resources for English language in schools, but the vast majority of them require you to register and log in first. For more information, see What is Englicious?

Englicious (C) Survey of English Usage, UCL, 2012-21 | Supported by the AHRC and EPSRC. | Privacy | Cookies